29 06, 2021

Who Will Be the Next Fed Chief? – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2021-06-29T00:55:13-04:00June 29th, 2021|Debt, Economist, Fed Reserve, Financial, Governments, Interest Rates, Outlook, Policy|0 Comments

One of the key decisions President Biden will make later this year is who is going to run the Federal Reserve for the next four years. Current Fed chief Jerome Powell's term as chairman runs out in February 2022. We think the choice will ultimately come down to two people: Roger Ferguson or Jerome Powell. [...]

7 04, 2021

Jobs Are Booming – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2021-04-07T00:39:12-04:00April 7th, 2021|Debt, Economist, Fear, Financial, Governments, International, Outlook, Spending|0 Comments

When the scientists said "15 days to slow the spread," some of us actually believed that by Easter the shutdowns would end. That was last year. Now, a full year, and $5 trillion in government spending later, we may finally be getting our wish. On Good Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the March [...]

16 03, 2021

Inflation and the Fed – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2021-03-16T15:03:53-04:00March 16th, 2021|Debt, Economist, Fed Reserve, Financial, GDP, Interest Rates, Outlook, Policy|0 Comments

We believe inflation is still, and always will be, a monetary phenomenon. It is defined as "too much money chasing too few goods and services" – but that doesn't mean every period of higher inflation is going to look exactly the same. Today's case for higher inflation is easy to understand. The M2 measure of [...]

8 12, 2020

2021: Robust Growth, Higher Inflation – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2020-12-08T17:05:37-05:00December 8th, 2020|Debt, Economist, Employment, Fear, Financial, Outlook, Policy|0 Comments

The COVID-19 Recession is the weirdest we've ever had. There is no way anyone could have forecast it. It did not happen because the Fed was too tight. It did not happen because of a trade war. It was self-inflicted, caused by COVID shutdowns. And, in spite of a V-shaped bounce off the bottom – [...]

4 08, 2020

Don’t Play GDP Politics – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2020-08-04T11:02:57-04:00August 4th, 2020|Debt, Economist, Financial, Governments, Media, Outlook|0 Comments

These days, pretty much everything is hyper-political, including death rates from disease, wearing masks, opening schools, whether some demonstrations are "mostly peaceful" or "violent," and now GDP. Late last week, plenty of headlines blared that real GDP declined 32.9% in the second quarter, suggesting that our country's output of goods and services was roughly 1/3 [...]

7 07, 2020

The Economy and The Virus – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2020-07-07T12:16:58-04:00July 7th, 2020|Debt, Employment, Financial, Media, Outlook|0 Comments

Not since the 1960s and 70s has the United States experienced social upheaval like it is experiencing today. We have protests (both peaceful and otherwise), and a massively divided political landscape. On top of that, we have a virus that is spreading across the country, creating fear and an acceptance of economic shutdowns. Originally, the [...]

30 03, 2020

The Coronavirus Threat – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2020-03-30T12:39:27-04:00March 30th, 2020|Debt, Fear, Financial, GDP, Governments, International, Outlook|0 Comments

Total deaths in the US from COVID19 look like they'll hit at least 3,000 by the end of March. A potentially brutal April lies ahead. In the meantime, the measures taken to limit deaths have temporarily tanked the US economy. Initial claims for jobless benefits soared to 3.283 million per week, easily the highest ever. [...]

24 09, 2019

Fear the Spending, Not the Debt – Wesbury’s Outlook

By |2019-09-24T06:46:37-04:00September 24th, 2019|Debt, Interest Rates, Outlook, Policy, Spending|0 Comments

Never underestimate the ability of politicians to mess up a good thing. They're certainly trying in Washington, D.C. Unfortunately, many people are concerned about the wrong thing. Nice even numbers fascinate people, and through the first eleven months of this fiscal year (October 2018 through August 2019), the U.S. budget deficit was over $1 trillion [...]

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